12-09

12-09. Hematite #7.

If we were to revisit cave painting a few thousand years forward, what would it look like? Hematite is still quite a source of inspiration!

From a resource by E. Maslen, V. Streltsov, N. Streltsova, and Ishizawa.

12-09

12-08

12-08. Hematite #6.

Do you wonder what a hematite sounds like?

Its unit cell structure gives us the score, the notation, the key, even the notes’ succession and tempo!

I may rework this artwork as a multimedia file as soon as done with this project focusing uniquely on the visual aspect of the geometry of minerals. The challenge is intriguing!

From a resource by L. Finger and R. Hazen

12-08

12-07. Hematite #5.

Opposites attract each other!

Case in point – the stable and elegant structure of the hematite unit cell and the apparent chaos of its multitude of atoms. The result? A mineral that brings a beautiful variation of red as a powder but not much else in the tangible reality.

From a resource by L. Finger and R. Hazen.

12-07

12-05

12-05. Hematite #3.

When art meets science: a hematite crystal transformation by real-time synchrotron powder diffraction.

From a resource by  A. Gualtieri and P. Venturelli.

12-05

04-01

04-01. Zoisite #7.

One last zoisite from Merelani Hills, Tanzania. This mineral took me places I really was not expecting. Not having any preconceived ideas about the visuals I’m doing makes it all the more fun!

As far as I know, the Masai from around the Kilimanjaro range don’t have a significant visual art tradition, yet they are a warm and vibrant people. Could it be related to the land they live on?

04-01

03-31

03-31. Zoisite #6.

Sometimes it’s better not to fight with inspiration!

This is not my normal style, this is not what I was expecting, but this design kept imposing itself to me over and again, draft after draft. I changed the resource settings, the orientation, even the structure parameters and it kept coming back at me like a “jazzy” Keith Haring – New York subway kind of image. I just had to surrender to it I guess! Zoisite is a very disconcerting mineral.

From a resource by Alvaro, Angel & Camara.

03-31

03-30

03-30. Zoisite #5.

Same mineral than yesterday, same location – what a different perspective! Nature (and maths) are beautiful.

From a resource by Alvaro, Angel & Camara: zoisite from Merelani Hills, Tanzania.

03-30

03-29

03-29. Zoisite #4.

I just realized something very important.

I’ve enjoyed going over the UofA mineralogy resources for the last 3 months. I’ve appreciated their authors’ good work and inspiration. But at the end of the day, someone has to go and get the mineral first! Mining is a hard, demanding job. Without it, we wouldn’t know how much wealth and beauty we have under our feet.

So today-  here’s to the miners and the many that bring such beautiful minerals to the surface of the planet for our enjoyment.

In this image, the structure is there, so are the atoms. I used different textures and light effects to make the background look like a mine pit. The odd shape in the foreground is a representation of the Van der Walls forces on a zoisite crystal found in Merelani Hills, Tanzania.

Database resource by Alvaro, Angel & Camara.

03-29