10-19

10-19. Cyrilovite #5.
Coincidence for the Season? A Halloween/Fall colored Cyrilovite crystal.

The bubbly expansion is a simple extraction of the crystal’s unit cell atomic structure in the VESTA program.

10-19

 

10-15

10-15. Cyrilovite #1.

A Cyrilovite from Cyrilov, Moravia – that’s a poetic and mysterious sounding name to start this week’s exploration of the geometry of Nature. Yellow to green, transparent to brown, Cyrilovite has a tetragonal structure with a P4 symmetry. It was discovered in 1953 in the Czech Republic.

Some say it carries with it a notion of respect, honor, and compassion. Are minerals projecting their properties onto humans or are humans projecting their wishes in minerals?

Well fitting with this week’s info background, a dear friend of mine sent me a link to a wonderful Chem-Haiku site. So here is the haiku of the week based on the chemical composition of the Cyrilovite. Thank you Mary Soon Lee for making the Periodic table so poetic and thank you, Tatiana, for being such a resourceful muse!

Cyrilovite chemical profile
NaFe3+3(PO4)2(OH)4·2(H2O)

Cyrilovite Haiku

Racing to trigger
every kiss, every kind act,
Servant, friend and partner

Radiant child
most of me is you
fundamental, essential.

Water, life.
Fuel for the stars

10-15

 

 

10-07

10-07. Rutile #7.

I started the week with a mask – I end this short exploration of the Rutile geometry with another mask. No recursion, just a front, perspective view of its structure. Such a well-balanced symmetry, it was a pleasure exploring this mineral and finding so many hidden links with pure geometry, abstract design, and West Africa local cultures.

10-07

10-06

10-06. Rutile #6.

The binding pattern of the rutile crystal is just too pretty to be tampered with! And it brings to mind this deja-vu feeling of some patterns used by local cultures where the mineral can be found. Coincidence maybe, but a beautiful geometrical coincidence.

10-06

10-05

10-05. Rutile #5.

Dancing in front of your eyes: 2029 atoms, 3354 bonds, 559 polyhedra – plus three who escaped this collective shimmy.

From a 1963 resource by R. Wyckoff.

10-05