11-10

11-10. Sklodowskite #6.

I spent a lot of time on this one, looking at what I could add or remove.

Finally, I think the design speaks for itself – theatom symmetry in a Sklodowskite crystal unit cell. The blue halo in the background? The playful but [dangerous] nature of the mineral maybe?

11-10

11-05

11-05. Sklodowskite #1.

Sklodowskite – early for Thanksgiving, but with a color scheme that would fit well on the family dinner table!

This mineral got its name after Marie Curie’s maiden name to honor her extensive work in the field of applied sciences and radioactivity.

The Sklodowskite a rare uranium mineral discovered by Belgian mineralogist Alfred Schoep in 1924. It belongs to the monoclinic group and has a B2 symmetry. Its bright yellow-green color is very vibrant and makes it a highly prized item in many mineral collections.

11-05

10-14

10-14. Lazulite #7.

The lazulite crystal shape is that of a stain-glass window opening to the world outside. Chaos is coming from all the little atoms trapped in that beautiful shape. Inside or out, they’re part of it all the same. I wonder if rocks evolve till they find stability? Some say they do.

Chaos is coming from all the little atoms trapped in that beautiful shape. Inside or out, they’re part of it all the same. I wonder if rocks evolve till they find stability? Some say they do. Lazulite has a beautiful house for them, ready to shine when they’ll figure out some equilibrium!

10-14

 

 

 

 

10-13

10-13. Lazulite #6.

Another perspective of an azulite crystal unit cell from the resource file I used on 10-11.

Apparently, this mineral hasn’t been studied much by the scientific community. Maybe cubism is not their thing?

10-13