08-13

08-13. Cobaltite #1.

Cobaltite – the leprechaun of minerals! Kobold  (Goblin in German), cobalt, cobaltite, that’s where the name cobalt is coming from. It must have inspired this picture. From this angle, the cobaltite structure looks like a trio of munchkins taking over the stage of an alternate space production of the Wizard of Oz.

There is still a debate regarding the exact crystal structure of Cobaltite and its geometry. It fits into the isometric system, but its lack of full crystal symmetry. And it is also part of the orthorhombic system. Cobaltite can be a brilliant blue stone found as veins in numerous environments. It also comes in reddish silver white, violet and steel gray. Despite its appearance, it is not a usable ore.

08-13

08-07

08-07. Cuprite #2.

A cuprite turning into a gyroid.

A gyroid is a unique geometrical form. It is a minimal surface that contains neither straight lines nor planar symmetry. The gyroid is the only known embedded triply periodic minimal surface with triple junctions. It was first mapped out by NASA scientist Alan Schoen in 1970.

Cuprite is the only mineral in nature that forms gyroids. They are often modified by other forms.

This gyroid was created with a small mathematical visualization utility called 3D-XplorMath.

From a resource by Kirfel and Eichhorn.

08-07