12-26

12-26. Diamond(b) #03

Is there such a thing as a visual digression?

Common practice in oral and written arts – I found myself carried into a visual digression! The diamond atoms’ symmetry led me to work on an optical illusion made famous by Hermann in the late 1800s. The “white dot in the black circle” after effect. Maybe it’s one of the reasons for diamond popularity – leaving an after-effect optical illusion in the viewer’s eye?

12-26

Advertisements

12-24

12-24. Diamond(b) #01

Last week of the Geometry of Nature project!

I started this project Jan 1st, 2017 with the mineral diamond. 52 weeks later, I thought it would be interesting to end with the same mineral. There are many reasons why diamond is so popular. One for me would be its incredibly well-composed geometry and its shine. How will this compare with the first week of the project? Who knows, life is a progression.

The name diamond comes from the ancient Greek – adámas “unbreakable”.  A good omen to start a new year, as it proved for the project. I don’t believe I missed more than 2 or 3 deadlines in this 365 days marathon, and I stayed focused through thick and thin on this incredible journey of discovery of Nature, geometry, and geometry in nature.

Interesting to know, the largest diamond found in the universe so far, BPM 37093, is located 50 light-years (4.7×1014 km) away in the constellation Centaurus. The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics describes the 2,500-mile (4,000 km)-wide stellar core as a diamond. Next year journey maybe?

12-24

12-23

12-23. Piypite #07

A strange but colorful and lively week! Piypite may be a rare and tiny mineral, its geometry is unexpectedly inspiring. All the more that I used only two resources in a rotation for these last seven days.

Credit should go to Effenberger & Zemann, Kahlenberg, Piotrowski & Giester, and of course to the program VESTA for bringing life to such interesting data.

12-23

12-21

12-21. Piypite #05

Between origami and tangram – the Piypite crystal unit cell definitely carries some Eastern flavor with it. Maybe its tetragonal pyramidal shape and the very complex body-centered 14 symmetry of its atoms help too.

From a resource by V. Kahlenberg, A. Piotrowski A, and G. Giester.

12-21

12-20

12-20. Piypite #04

Piypite tiling.

The tetragonal structure of the crystal makes for very dynamic patterns. I moved the atoms in the background this time – too many of them, too distracting! Opposites attract each other, someone said. Is this a natural way to confirm the suggestion? Hundreds of unruly atoms in a clean, elegant, well-balanced geometry.

The two work well together to develop small but lovely grass-like green blades.

12-20