04-07

04-07. Topaz #6.

I knew something was different with this topaz structure. I read the spec. after I finished the image and here it is – the crystal comes from Sulu, China. From Brazil to China – same scientific & technical profile – different emotional outlook. Nature is fascinating!

From a resource by Alberico, Ferrando, Ivaldi & Ferraris.

04-07

04-05

04-05. Topaz #4.

Is that a jungle god emerging from the amazon river, the double-faced Janus etched in the mineral or the spirit of a topaz floating over the town of Ouro Plato? The polyhedral structure of this crystal looks so strange – I left it almost as is.

At times, artistic creativity is to know when to step back and bring to the surface what’s already there. Obviously, there is more to this mineral than just color and reflection.

From an Ouro Prato topaz resource by Gatta, Nestola & Ballaran called – Elastic behavior and structural evolution of a topaz at high pressure.

04-05

04-04

04-04. Topaz #3.

This one to the people of Ouro Prato!

Ouro Prato, Brazil, is one of the oldest and largest topaz mines in the world. This community is also one of the rare examples where mining has benefited directly the locals – to a point where a unique name was given to this town’s architectural and artistic expression – Barroco miner – or miners’ baroque. Maybe not quite our taste today but back in the 1700s, the Portugues brought with them the best they had to offer and shared it. This town is today part of the UNESCO world heritage center.

The strange “baroque looking” pattern of the bonds joining together the atoms of this topaz structure made me think of that unexpected connection. The two little tangram-like characters dancing the bossa-nova? I leave it up to your imagination, but they are an exact representation of the topaz polyhedral structure. A tour of the geometry of Nature can be educational, entertaining – and fun too!

From a resource by Chen, Lager, Kunz & Ulmer.

04-04

04-03

04-03. Topaz #2.

Do minerals have feelings? An odd question indeed – but topaz seems like a very shy mineral to me. Its structure is quite pleasant but it seems at the same time quiet, discrete, and shy compared to the crystals arrangements I visited previously in this project. Kandinsky was the first artists I know who worked extensively on points, lines, angles and how they determine emotions. I’ll have to re-read the master.

Study of Nature and mineralogy is inspiring in more ways than one!

From a resource by Northrup, Leinenweber, & Parise

04-03

04-02

04-02. Topaz #1.

Topaz is the mineral of week #14 in this 52 weeks tour of Geometry of Nature. The topaz crystal belongs to the orthorhombic system – three unequal axes at right angles resulting in a rectangular prism with a rectangular base.  It is very hard but easy to break. Pure topaz is colorless and transparent but, depending on the inclusions, it is often found in a wide range of color brown, blue, green, yellow, orange, red, pink, and purple.

The most important Topaz deposits are in Brazil. The famous golden orange-brown Imperial Topaz come from the famous occurrence in Minas Gerais at Ouero Prito. Multicolored yellow and blue Topaz comes from Russia. Classic yellow Topaz crystals come from Germany.

Legend has it that Hildegarde of Flanders, wife of Theodoric Count of Holland, presented a topaz to a monastery in the town of Ghent. It emitted a light so bright at night that prayers could be read without the aid of candles in the chapel where it was kept.

04-02