04-22

04-22. Olivine #7.

1,403 atoms, 2,628 bonds, 490 polyhedra! The polyhedra setting makes for a splendid background pattern. I also included the full olivine structure as little cubes on a shelf.

Resource from Muller-Sommer, Hock and Kirfel.

04-22

04-21

04-21. Olivine #6.

The birth of an olivine? It all happens in between the flower-like arrangement of the atoms

From a resource by Muller-Sommer, Hock and Kirfel.

04-21

04-20

04-20. Olivine #5.

The color and texture of this visualization remind me of a project I worked on a few years ago called Martematica. Maybe this olivine is coming from a meteorite or is a fragment of the planet Mars that landed here?

The resource from Muller-Sommer, Hock, and Kirfel does not mention the origin of the crystal.

04-20

04-19

04-19. Olivine #4.

Olivine is a complex and mysterious crystal. The dance of its atoms in the structure is inspiring and quite pretty to look at!

From a resource by Muller-Sommer, Hock & Kirfel.

04-19

04-16

04-16. Olivine #1.

Week # 16: Olivine – one of the most common minerals on earth, and also found in meteorites. A mineral as mysterious as Cleopatra green jewels that actually may have been Peridot crystals. Olivine can be found as small pebbles, but large crystals such as Peridots are very rare and have been sought after since antiquity.

Olivine was formed in Earth’s infancy, created in magma and spewed to the surface by active volcanoes. Falling to the ground, the molten crystals were forced to take on the shape of a teardrop. Some say this was the reason ancient Hawaiians thought Peridot and Olivine were tears of the volcano goddess Pele.

Olivine is recognized as a mineral group and belongs to the orthorhombic system. The larger crystals like peridot are wide, short and prismatic. The intensity of their color depends on the amount of iron present in their chemical structure; the more iron it contains the deeper green it will be.

A very complex structure to deal with after last week’s simple and elegant symmetry of a silver crystal! This peridot profile by Miyake, Nakamura, Kojima, Marumo is made of 99 atoms, 138 bonds, 25 polyhedra. The bonds between the atoms make for an interesting stainless window pattern. The sand below the (spatial) wheel is a reminder of St. John’s Island (Zagbargad) in the Red Sea, the ancient Pharaohs’  private island where very large peridot crystals could be found.

04-16