12-02

12-02. Platinum #7.

From a resource by N. Uspenski and S Konobejewski.

12-02

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12-01

12-01. Platinum #6.

Platinum, atoms’ symmetry variation.

From a resource by W. Davey.

12-01

 

11-28

11-28. Platinum #3.

If you care to reconcile Mathematics and Nature, Platinum, also called the “environment mineral” is a good option. Its crystal is cubic in nature and comes as hexoctahedron or tetrahexahedron. Nice 3-fold symmetry too!

From a resource by A. Hull

11-28

 

11-26

11-26. Platinum #1.

Mysterious and more precious than Gold, Platinum is going to be the mineral for week #48.

Known for a long time by pre-Columbian cultures, 16th-century  Italian scholar J. J. Scaliger describes it as a strange metal found in mines between Panama and Mexico that no fire or any of the Spanish arts could melt. A few hundred years later, Platinum has become a choice component of precious jewelry and anti-pollution devices. It is stable, durable, and does not corrode. It also facilitates chemical reactions without being altered. Some call it the “Environment metal”.

Platinum’s geometry is fascinating too — from cubic to hexoctahedral, it is one of the rare crystals in nature with the shape of a tetrahexahedron – 24 congruent isosceles triangles, four to each face of a cube.

This is the first iteration of this unique and uncommon crystal. From a two-dimensional perspective, its geometry lends itself to very attractive stain glass window design.

11-26