06-17

06-17. Calcite #7.

The original file was called “generalized spherical harmonic of calcite powders”. The experiment was done for the Journal of Applied Crystallography in 2005 and used X-ray diffraction to optimize the model orientation.

Again, I only read the experiment descriptive once done with the visualization. Fun all the same to capture some of the spirits behind the numbers.

From a resource by Sitepu & O’Connor

06-17

 

 

 

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06-16

06-16. Calcite #6.

The case of the golden rhombus. Is there more to add? Nature in all its simplicity – spheres, triangles and a beautiful symmetry to add.

From a resource by R. Wyckoff.  Crystal Structures of the calcite.

06-16

06-15

06-15. Calcite #5.

Strange shapes escaping from what originally was an X-ray diffraction of a calcite from Cuenca Spain.

From a resource by  Antao S M, Hassan.

06-15

06-13

06-13. Calcite #3.

There is a cave somewhere in France – The crystal cave of Bellacroix it is called. It was discovered somewhere in the 1700s or 1800s. Beautiful calcite adorned its ceiling. It got vandalized so many times – locals had to block the entrance with a metal grid. I hope, the gate maker got inspired by the beautiful geometry of its crystal. To get this pattern,  I just took the outline of the binding between the atoms and multiplied it several times.

From a resource by Markgraf and Reeder.

06-13

06-12

06-12. Calcite #2.

I read the resource file title only after I was done with the visualization. I thought it was worth including. Sometimes, there is some coincidental poetry when the arts meet.

From a resource by P. Althoff: calcite structural refinements and implications for dolomite formation in the marine environment.

06-12

06-11

06-11. Calcite #1.

Calcite is the mineral of week #24.

Transparent to opaque and on some occasion phosphorescent or fluorescent, a variety of Calcite called Iceland spar has been used in experiments for a cloak of invisibility, a tradition that goes back to the Nibelungenlied apparently.

Calcite is often the primary constituent of the shells of marine organisms, the hard parts of red algae, some sponges, and oysters. Without calcite and aragonite, many of Earth’s organisms could not exist. Calcite crystals are part of the trigonal-rhombohedral system. Components of crystals in the trigonal system are located by reference to four axes—three of equal length with 120° intersections and one perpendicular to the plane of the other three.

Calcite crystals are part of the trigonal-rhombohedral system. Components of crystals in the trigonal system are located by reference to four axes—three of equal length with 120° intersections and one perpendicular to the plane of the other three.

Calcite was used in ancient Egypt to make artifacts and adorns the tombs of several Pharaohs. Today, large deposits can be found in the Snowy River Cave of New Mexico, one of the longest cave formation in the world.

06-11