08-05

08-05. Kaolinite #7.

A mineral with a sense of humor!

Kaolinite geometry lends itself well to some mathematical fun. Maybe a very subjective interpretation of the crystal shape – but in my mind, it fits quite naturally iin paper making production.

The polyhedra chain at the bottom of the image: a kaolin ream of paper. The two central motives: the same ream of paper cut in 8×10 sheets of paper neatly stacked on top of each other.

Credit should go to VESTA artistic side and its very inspiring mineral modeling visualization.

From a resource by Bish and Von Dreele.

08-05

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08-04

08-04. Kaolinite #6.

The Kaolinite crystal has a simple double triangle geometry – or maybe not that simple design-wise if you let symmetry and tessellation take over. Another gift of nature for us to grab if we know where to look.

From a resource by W. Gruner.

08-04

08-03

08-03. Kaolinite #5.

Kaoline puts me again in an origami state of mind. The vertices arrangement of its geometry and the prominent double triangle may have something to do with it.

08-03

08-02

08-02. Kaolinite #4.

Two types of kaolinite in one triptych-like view of the crystal structure. Kaolinite crystal is mostly transparent and the color comes from the inclusions.

08-02

08-01

08-01. Kaolinite #3.

Dream day for a kaolinite.

What’s remarkable about the crystal geometry is that it may be packed and very busy, it always ends being of one piece and comfortable in whatever situation it is in.

From a resource by D.L. Bish.

08-01

 

07-31

07-31. Kaolinite #2.

A paper sculpture or an unfolded origami? The paper in the kaolin background and history seems to not only influence my design but also the shape and geometry of its cell structure.

From a resource by Bish and Von Dreele.

07-31

07-30

07-30. Kaolite #1.

If diamonds are a girl best friend, Kaolin should be voted writer’ best friend. Over 50% of this mineral goes into the producing the best and the softest, paper available. Silky, smooth, and shiny – three quality well appreciated by photographers, artists and all that still use paper to express their creative self. I’ll explore its geometry this week.

Kaolinite – or kaolin was known centuries ago in the Orient and was used to glaze clay and porcelain. It was brought to the West in the mid-1700 by a French Jesuit. Today it has made its way in the production of paper,  pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and various product health products.

The jury is still out regarding its geometry and structure – monoclinic or triclinic. All agree though, its symmetry is a two translation P1 symmetry. In mathematics, it would be called – periodic – meaning a repetition that happens regularly in all directions.

The soft bluish glow of the crystal and the dynamic arrangement of its geometry make it a worthy candidate for a cubism style investigation. Maybe I should title this image “Juan Gris’ sketch book”. Even the vertical view of the crystal structure on the left starts to look like a guitar – if you put your mind to it!

07-30