02-25

02-25. Zargun #7.

“Mechanical Klee”

Beautiful but strange structure emerging on the last day of this series. I left  A.  Kolesov, C. Geiger & T. Armbruster resource data on the dynamic properties of a zargun (zircon) – almost untouched. A timeless representation of a 4 billion-year-old crystal. It also reminds me of some of the dreamy figures Paul Klee use to draw. 

02-25

02-23

02-23. Zargun #5.

Same cell unit than yesterday, exposed to p:37.1 bar pressure this time. Is art sensitive to stress? So would glass, as in stained glass window – and glass is sand! 

Database resource by R. Hazen & L. Finger.

02-23

02-22

02-22. Zargun #4

The polyhedra in this image drew me in this Japanese origami paper folding arrangement. Don’t ask me why – privilege of art I guess! I sprinkled it with some real zircon (zargun) for good measure.

From a database resource by R Hazen & L. Finger: Crystal structure and compressibility of zircon at high pressure; p:28.9 kbar.

02-22

02-20

02-20. Zargun #2.

Crystal structure and compressibility of zircon (zargun) at high pressure.

Science and Nature are inspiring in many more ways than one! From a database resource by R. Hazen & L. Finger.

02-20

02-19

02-19. Zargun #1.

Week 8, from chrysoberyl to (zargun) – the oldest mineral on earth! More background information, the second week of January.

First big mistake of the project. I already did a (zargun- zircon) the second week of January. I caught with the mishap only March – too late to change the blog structure!

I guess credits go to the UofA extensive resource library and the VESTA program that allows me to investigate so many possible outcomes.  I didn’t even notice the similarities with the previous series!

I could have removed this entire week or keep it as is – I decided to keep it as is – with a different name this time to separate the two series. Zargun it will be. It is the ancient Persian name for zircon. The gold-hued one – a fitting tribute to the oldest mineral on the planet.

This first visualization is made after a database resource by B. Kolesov, C. Geiger, and T. Armbruster.

02-19

01-31

01-31- Fluorite #3.

Fluorite reflects light from everywhere. In this sketch, I centered the design of its beautiful geometrical symmetry around a hole-centered inclusion – a lost electron liberated by irradiation – that defines its color spectrum -. Gemdat.org gave me the idea for it. Nature is truly amazing!

Database resource by S. Speziale S & T. Duffy.

01-31

01-29

01-29- Fluorite #1.

This week’s mineral is going to be Fluorite. Fluorite is colorless, soft, and almost translucent. The rainbow color associated with it come from inclusions trapped in the crystal. Its atoms create simple, beautiful symmetrical patterns. After a week reorganizing the frantic chaos of Jade atoms, lines, and edges, this week will be all color and transparencies.

Some say this crystal relates to mental order and clarity and convey calm, and stable frequencies. Fluorite has been known since antiquity. In China, purple Fluorite was supposed to give protection against evil spirits, its clusters were considered to be “dream makers.” The Romans believed drinking from a vessel made of Fluorite would prevent a person from becoming intoxicated. I’ll let this week’s colors and patterns be the judge of that!

01-29