02-22

02-22. Zargun #4

The polyhedra in this image drew me in this Japanese origami paper folding arrangement. Don’t ask me why – privilege of art I guess! I sprinkled it with some real zircon (zargun) for good measure.

From a database resource by R Hazen & L. Finger: Crystal structure and compressibility of zircon at high pressure; p:28.9 kbar.

02-22

02-20

02-20. Zargun #2.

Crystal structure and compressibility of zircon (zargun) at high pressure.

Science and Nature are inspiring in many more ways than one! From a database resource by R. Hazen & L. Finger.

02-20

02-19

02-19. Zargun #1.

Week 8, from chrysoberyl to (zargun) – the oldest mineral on earth! More background information, the second week of January.

First big mistake of the project. I already did a (zargun- zircon) the second week of January. I caught with the mishap only March – too late to change the blog structure!

I guess credits go to the UofA extensive resource library and the VESTA program that allows me to investigate so many possible outcomes.  I didn’t even notice the similarities with the previous series!

I could have removed this entire week or keep it as is – I decided to keep it as is – with a different name this time to separate the two series. Zargun it will be. It is the ancient Persian name for zircon. The gold-hued one – a fitting tribute to the oldest mineral on the planet.

This first visualization is made after a database resource by B. Kolesov, C. Geiger, and T. Armbruster.

02-19

02-18

02-18. Chrysoberyl #7.

Chrysoberyl as fruits on a vine! So it looks like from the database resource of S. Weber, M. Grodzicki, W. Lottermoser, G. Redhammer, G. Tippelt,  J. Ponahlo & G. Amthauer.

This is a composition after their calculation of the electronic structure of a natural alexandrite from Malyshevo in the Ural mountains, Russia. Nice way to end the week!

02-18

02-17

02-17. Chrysoberyl #6.

From a very similar Hazen&Finger database resource than yesterday. What a remarkable difference! All it took was to remove a few atoms. It brought up this strange, symmetrical and spherical symbol. I repeated it several times on the background for good measure!

02-17

02-16

02-16. Chrysoberyl #5.

From Hazen & Finger study on high-temperature crystal chemistry of phenakite and chrysoberyl. My (designer) conclusion – they don’t get along too well esthetically. For some reason, the units lose the consistency, harmony, and balance of the previous pure chrysoberyl design. Art too is a journey of discovery!

02-16

02-15

02-15. Chrysoberyl #4

Completely surprised again!

I barely retouched the original visualization. I found the combination of the almost perfect symmetry and hypnotizing moire effect totally irresistible! I guess credits for this one should go to Koichi Momma for maintaining the VESTA program and R.Hazen & L. Finger for their database resource hosted by the UofA in Tucson, AZ.

02-15

02-14

02-14. Chrysoberyl #3

Another unexpected outcome.

Chrysoberyl is a very hard crystal ( 8.5 on the Mohs’ scale of hardness) but apparently, ready to offer a wealth of visual information. That is –  if you’re patient enough, and know where to look!

From the database resource of R.Hazen.

02-14

02-13. Chrysoberyl

02-13. Chrysoberyl #2

This improbable shape is actually several variations of a chrysoberyl crystal cell. The odd arrow-like structures are the arrangement of the 24 polyhedra that constitute a single shell. I left them as they came! The 141 atoms create an interesting symmetry pattern too.

From data resources collected by W. Bragg & G. Brown.

02-13