02-10

02-10. Beryl #6.

From Aurisicchio, Fioravanti, Grubessi and Zanazzi, structure analysis of a beryl from the Violet Claims, Wah Wah Mountains, Beaver County, Utah.

Too many electrons for me on this one! If I had to make a cultural connection, it kind of vaguely reminds me of those turn-of-the-nineteen-century objects/pictures you find in Durango, CO. second-hand shops.

02-10

02-09

02-09. Beryl #5.

Morrua, Zambesia. This is where the crystal studied Aurisicchio, Fioravanti, Grubessi and P. Zanazzi originates from.

I’ve never been to Mozambique. The late Paul Gerdes spent his career there researching the connection between mathematics and local basketry pattern. Was Beryl the [subconcious] source of their inspiration?

02-09

02-08

02-08. Beryl #4.

From the work of  C. Aurisicchio, G. Fioravanti, O. Grubessi and P. Zanazzi on the crystal chemistry of a beryl found in Mohave county, Arizona, USA

Anyone who ever drove Highway 40 – Gallup to Barstow – at sunset or sunrise, probably can relate to the warm color scheme and strange cloud pattern…

02-08

02-07

02-07. Beryl #3.

C. Aurisicchio, G. Fioravanti, O. Grubessi and P. Zanazzi used a 4 color scheme to define the structure of this elegant crystal that came from Val d’Ossola, Italy.

So did I with the background of the composition.

02-07

02-06

02-06. Beryl #2.

From a database resource by R. Hazen, A. Au, and L. Finger – High-pressure crystal chemistry of beryl and euclase. Euclase is a crystal often found in beryl deposits.

02-06

02-05

02-05. Beryl #1.

Beryl will be the crystal of this week in this 52-week tour of the Geometry of nature. A tall order if anything – emerald, aquamarines are all variation of the beryl structure.

Rather than focus into one particular mineral, I will explore the generic structure of Beryl samples from around the world.

Beryl is a relatively rare hexagonal silicate mineral. Pure Beryl is colorless. Traces of different impurities are responsible for the color diversity and varieties. Roman author Pliny advised powdered beryl to cure eye injuries – a good tip for designers!  Another lore claims it helps fight laziness – another great tip for designers – and many other – working on a deadline!

The first beryl structure I’ll use this week is coming from a mineral found in Taos, New Mexico. Whether coincidence or choice, the color of the different elements of that particular structure were all set in a scheme of bright primaries that locals from that part of the world and mariachi bands are so fond of. Could it be another example of art being subconsciously influenced by the nature surrounding it? Database resource by G. Brown and B. Mills.

02-05