09-02

09-02. Kornerupine #7.

Kornerupine in a box!

Yes, that’s the way it came up today in the VESTA software. What an amazing little crystal – after a glorious week of celebrating symmetry, balance, and harmony, its atoms just went back quietly into their original unit cell and left in the market place the outline of a very pleasant 3D abstract sculpture.

Thanks for the show – Kornerupine!

09-02

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09-01

09-01. Kornerupine #6.

The spirit of the Cornerupine seems to be still floating over Greenland….

This is the crystal shape of the mineral in a frame made of a repeated pattern of the structure’s polyhedra on a bed of a Kornurepine picture close-up

09-01

08-30

08-30. Kornerupine #4.

Pink Kornerupine from Lanark Ontario, Canada.

Kornerupines usually comes in transparent blue or greenish color. I’ve seen some take on a purplish tone. This one may have taken on the color of the pink marble it was found buried in. Another great interplay of geometry and Nature. While we can rely on mathematics and geometry to identify any given mineral, color depends on many different parameters that make a definitive descriptive tentative at best.

When you join mathematics and art – you often get poetry. Well worth it all the same!

08-30

08-29

08-29. Kornerupine #3.

The Kornerupine crystal structure pattern and symmetry is fascinating. Nature is a great source of inspiration for all kind of designs!

08-29

08-28

08-28. Kornerupine #2.

Crystal structure of a Kornerupine – or/and maybe, some strange figure emerging from a Paul Klee’s painting.

From a resource by Klaska & Grew

08-28

08-27

08-27. Kornerupine #1.

Coming from the land of the green – Kornerupine is the mineral of week 35.

And no I didn’t choose the crystal structure frame – the frame chose me! This pattern comes from the simple repetitive symmetry of the polyhedra. It also comes very close to indigenous local tradition in Greenland. Interesting coincidence knowing that Kornerupine is a tiny and very rare mineral first identified in SouthWest Greenland in the late 1800s. 

Some have been found since in Kenya, Australia, and Myanmar, Tanzania, and Madagascar.

This mineral is transparent to green-yellow and comes in long orthorhombic prisms. Its symmetry is Cmcm – no rotations and reflection axes parallel – a type of symmetry found in Assyria and ancient Egypt design and also at the Alhambra in Spain – and even today in Greenland local bead work.

08-27