2022 JMM, Art exhibit catalog

Catalog for the Exhibition of Mathematical Art held in conjunction with the 2022 Joint Mathematics Meetings. Descriptions of the works and statements by the artists. Edited by Dan Bach, Robert Fathauer, and Nathan Selikoff. 7.5″ x 7.5″, 100 pages. Now available @ https://mathartfun.com/ExhibitionCatalogs.html

JMM 2022, Art exhibit catalog

JMM 2022, Art exhibit

Catalog for the Exhibition of Mathematical Art held in conjunction with the 2022 Joint Mathematics Meetings. Descriptions of the works and statements by the artists. Edited by Dan Bach, Robert Fathauer, and Nathan Selikoff. 7.5″ x 7.5″, 100 pages. Now available @ https://mathartfun.com/ExhibitionCatalogs.html

JMM 2022, Art exhibit catalog cover

Polyverse

Another year, another project. A 52-week exploration of H. Coxeter surfaces. Coxeter  wa a giant of mathematics and was instrumental in many discoveries in the field of geometry , computer sciences and opened for us the door to the  4th dimension. 

What the torus is to the minimal surface, the triangle is in the Coxeter universe and it stands as the anchor of all other complex figures to come. Here is my first step in the fascinating world of polytopes.

You can follow the weekly progression of this project on FaceBook @ jeanconstant49 

Polytope- triangle

Knot Geometry update

Last year’s project, The Knot Geometry Journey, is now available in print or electronic format. It includes the art portfolio, the geometry that inspired it and a log book of this knot journey around the world.

170 pages, over 100 illustrations, notes and references @ the iBook store, GooglePlay, Kindle and Barnes & Noble

The project’s illustrations are available individually, large format (up to 24×24”), canvas or paper @ SaatchiArt  

Knot Geometry journey, part I, II & III covers

Celebrating a double-unknot

All knots start with from an unknot – a torus in mathematical terms. 

Back to Null 52 weeks and 52 mathematical knots later circling the globe on the equator line, it’s time to conclude with one last knot. The Clifford’s torus is the simplest most symmetric embedding of 2 circles. Or in the KnotGeometryProject terms: one unknot for the beginning of the year, and one for today. This torus is also the transition to many new shapes I’ll explore next year. 

Thank you for having followed the Knot geometry project this year. I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did. With my best wishes for a very happy and safe 2021.

Fang knot

Fang mask created filling the empty space of a 6.1 knot. 

As the Knot geometry project is passing over the Lome National park in Gabon,  I discovered a 6.1 knot had all the components of an interesting Fang wooden sculpture. 

Traditional Fang and Ntumu art was very popular in the early 19200 with the modernists and the like of Klee and Picasso

Tshuapa dances

A C4 Conway knot converted in Knotplot. C4 also identifies tetragonal structures in the mineral world. As the knot-journey is passing over Tshuapa, next to the mighty Congo river. Good occasion to celebrate the ample supply of cassiterite ore buried in the local river beds.

More on the Knot-Geometry project on Patreon

Mugumo knot carving

A handsome 8.2.3 knot made of Mugumo wood to celebrate the knot geometry project passing over Mount Kenya. The Mugumo fig tree is a sacred tree for the Kikuyu communities living near Mt Kenya. They’re also known for their basketry skills and knot making expertise as the image background can tell.

Thanks, Cyan LeMonnis for the inspiration & your tasteful Kiondo bags.